Freelancer.com – What Is Good And What Is Not?

Freelancer.com has been around for a really long time and I decided to check it out for a while. My time there has been insightful, but also really exhausting.

Here are some great and bad things about Freelancer.com that might be useful to you.

Plenty of job listings

Since Freelancer.com is among the biggest crowdsourcing marketplaces, it boasts a lot of projects you can propose to.

There are new projects every second depending on the time of the day.

This comes to no surprise since writing jobs are in pretty high demand and therefore most of the jobs that pop-up are writing jobs!

Another big branch that has a lot of job postings is graphic design.

Software developers will also be amazed by how many jobs there are available at first glance.

Low entry requirement

Anyone can try their luck to win a project with their bids.

It all comes down to how you use your bids and what you write in your proposal.

If you write a great proposal and take your time there is a chance that you can do it.

Check out my post on how to increase your chances to be awarded!

Of course, if you boast some reviews and portfolio items your chances are obviously higher.

But the point is, you can land projects no matter how long you are on Freelancer.com.

Detailed insights

There is a page on Freelancer.com for insights that are actually a good summary of how well you do.

You find your earnings, ratings and ratings per skill.

But most importantly, you can find how many bids you need on average until you reach a completed milestone.

Also, really useful, it shows you have many projects you bid on have been awarded.

You can use that insight to bid more effectively as well and record what works and what does not.

Although these are great aspects, there are points that are not that great.

The competition is insane

Seriously, it IS insane, mainly because, because Freelancer.com is the biggest job marketplace.

Whenever a new project pops up, even if the employer has no verifications, there are already 5 bids within a minute if not more.

Obviously, that makes it difficult for someone who does not have a single review on their account.

Freelancer.com offers you paid options to “boost” your proposal so it is more visible for the employer for a cost.

I do not think they ethical, but at the same time, I have never seen a boosted bid so far.

freelancer.com bid boost overview
Options to upgrade your bid

There is a 10% fee (or 5 USD) for every milestone

For people who have no idea what a milestone is: Basically, the employer pays money in the escrow system and cannot take it back unless the freelancer agrees to it.

The employer will release the funds to the freelancer if he is satisfied.

A milestone is the agreement to release the funds when a requirement is fulfilled.

As a freelancer, you pay 10% of the milestone’s value or 5 USD flat, whichever is higher.

That is pretty harsh in my opinion.

On the bright side, if you decide to accept a milestone or project without any funds in your account, Freelancer.com lets you go into a negative balance.

That means you can start out without paying and if everything fails you will not lose any money.

Jobs are generally low-paid

On top of the fees, there is the issue that most of the jobs are asking for way more than they give.

$4 for each article containing 1000 words ($0.004/word)

As you can see, they may offer bulk work, but think about the number of words you need to write for them to cover your costs.

Imagine writing 100000 words for $400. Most Freelance writers I have heard of don’t even come close to 100000 words in a month and earn a full-time income.

Remember that creating articles is more than just writing words down. You need to research, have a nice structure that makes sense, sometimes you need to look for pictures to use and much more.

Obviously, there are freelancers from all countries and in economically weaker countries that might be worth it.

Scams are common

Don’t think this problem is exclusive to Freelancer.com.

You should be really careful who you trust and just follow the site’s rules to ensure that you won’t get scammed.

There are people asking for your UpWork account, asking to use TeamViewer to connect to your PC or trying to steal work form you.

Scammers mostly target beginners since they are inexperienced which the scammers want to use to their advantage.

The moment you receive some reviews and reputation, they won’t even bother trying their scams on you.

Conclusion

If you want a quick entry without much preparation and some portfolio items, by all means, you should go for it.

But if you feel like the fees and mass amount of useless project posts are not worth it, you should stay away from it.

Check out this list for a lot of ideas where to start out or even build your career. It has helped me a lot, too.

Feel free to leave feedback down below, I am grateful for either negative and positive responses.

I wish every single one great success!

Updated: 06.11.2019

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *